CHAIN SLINGS

TO MAKE YOUR GRADE 80 or GRADE 100 ALLOY CHAIN SLING

Follow these steps in making a sling assembly:
    Figure 1
  1. Determine the maximum load to be lifted by the sling assembly.
  2. Choose the type of sling assembly suited for the shape of the load and the size of the sling assembly for the load to be lifted. The decision must take into account the angle of the sling legs in multi leg slings.
  3. Determine the overall reach for bearing point of master link to bearing point on hook. (see Fig. 1)
  4. Select components, assemble chain and components.
  5. Affix sling identification tag to sling.
Each sling shall be marked to show: name or trademark of manufacturer, grade, nominal chain size, number of legs, rated load for the type(s) of hitch (es) used and angle upon which it is based (reach).

If measurement comes in the link, cut the following link. For two leg type slings, count the links and use an even number for clevis hooks and an odd number for eye hooks. This will position hooks in the same plane. In multi leg slings always use the same number of links in each leg.

Figure 2When using chain slings in choker applications, the Working Load Limit must be reduced by 20%. Midco recommends a minimum angle of choke of 120 degrees. Consult Midco when planning to use an angle of choke of less than 120 degrees. If cradle grab hooks are used at a minimum angle of choke of 120 degrees, the full sling rated WLL can be utilized.

In shortening applications, a 20% reduction of the Working Load Limit is required except when using a cradle grab hooks or chain shortener link. They can be used without any reduction to the Working Load Limit.

NEVER EXCEED THE WORKING LOAD LIMIT!

Technical Information Bridon 6x19
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